Author Topic: Science thread [merged]  (Read 19020 times)

Offline dwaino

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Science thread [merged]
« on: July 04, 2012, 08:32:46 PM »
For any science buffs out there. It was close last year, but not quite. CERN have been quiet, and I was skeptical this most recent time because I thought it would be the same as last year's observation. More and more is leaking now and looks like we're on the brink of the biggest scientific breakthrough of the last few decades

http://phys.org/news/2012-07-video-preludes-higgs-boson.html
« Last Edit: August 06, 2012, 05:49:44 PM by one-eyed »
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Offline 1965

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2012, 08:42:47 PM »
For any science buffs out there. It was close last year, but not quite. CERN have been quiet, and I was skeptical this most recent time because I thought it would be the same as last year's observation. More and more is leaking now and looks like we're on the brink of the biggest scientific breakthrough of the last few decades

http://phys.org/news/2012-07-video-preludes-higgs-boson.html

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Offline Coach

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2012, 08:46:10 PM »
For any science buffs out there. It was close last year, but not quite. CERN have been quiet, and I was skeptical this most recent time because I thought it would be the same as last year's observation. More and more is leaking now and looks like we're on the brink of the biggest scientific breakthrough of the last few decades

http://phys.org/news/2012-07-video-preludes-higgs-boson.html

It is the Carbon Tax's fault.

 :cheers

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Offline 1965

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2012, 08:49:19 PM »
For any science buffs out there. It was close last year, but not quite. CERN have been quiet, and I was skeptical this most recent time because I thought it would be the same as last year's observation. More and more is leaking now and looks like we're on the brink of the biggest scientific breakthrough of the last few decades

http://phys.org/news/2012-07-video-preludes-higgs-boson.html

It is the Carbon Tax's fault.

 :cheers

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Offline dwaino

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2012, 08:55:39 PM »
The tachyon orders a beer. A tachyon walks into a bar.
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Offline mightytiges

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2012, 04:36:44 AM »
An oldie but a goodie dwaino lol.

For any science buffs out there. It was close last year, but not quite. CERN have been quiet, and I was skeptical this most recent time because I thought it would be the same as last year's observation. More and more is leaking now and looks like we're on the brink of the biggest scientific breakthrough of the last few decades

http://phys.org/news/2012-07-video-preludes-higgs-boson.html
Basically they've finally found it (mass 125.3 +/- 0.6 GeV from the slide in the talk IIRC) although technically they can't claim it as so just yet. So it's massive (excuse the pun) news in Physics circles. It completes the experimental observation of the Standard Model subatomic set of particles that was theorised almost 50 years ago. The Standard Model is basically a theory about the fundamental building blocks of the universe and how they all fit together. The experimental observation of the Higgs boson which generates mass was the final 'missing link'.

83 year old Peter Higgs should now get a Nobel Prize.


As an aside it also shows that in modern science, theory often leads experiment and in some cases by decades as we need to wait for technology to catch-up to fully confirm theoretical predictions. If we dismissed all theory based on an inability to completely experimentally prove every aspect of it, nothing would ever get done. In fact the overall acceptance of a theory often leads to further knowledge that leads to the ability to experimentally fully test the theory. Certain anti-science political neo-cons should remember that  ::).
« Last Edit: July 06, 2012, 11:28:01 PM by mightytiges »
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Offline dwaino

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2012, 10:20:11 AM »
So far using the Standard Model, the physics works. Once anything in the Standard Model makes the physics not work then we have to throw it out the window and start again. But that's what science is all about  :cheers

You're right that it's only an observation so far and they're going to great lengths to clarify that. The media hype and chucking the term 'god particle' around is a little premature and sensational. For all we know, they may have only found another sub-atomic particle weighing in at 125.3 GeV. Will have to wait on results on things like if there is a charge, spin, etc

I'm pretty sure if it's confirmed, Michio Kaku will retire and just make a killing from writing books for the rest of his life  :laugh: IMO, if and when it is indeed confirmed, it will be the greatest scientific discovery until somebody manages to manipulate space-time.
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Offline mightytiges

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2012, 02:40:56 PM »
IMO, if and when it is indeed confirmed, it will be the greatest scientific discovery until somebody manages to manipulate space-time.
Yoda can  ;D

But seriously there's still plenty of things on the physics 'big things to do' list...
* Formulating Quantum Gravity ..... Einstein's theory of general relativity isn't a quantised gravitational theory (the other forces of nature have quantised theories). This is where advocates of string theory come in.
* Matter only makes up only 4% of the universe. So finding out what is dark matter (25%) and dark energy would be a huge discovery. 
* A full mathematically solved description of what causes 'confinement' in the strong (atomic nucleus binding) force theory. 
* The holy grail of a Grand Unified Theory .... one unified theory for the four forces of nature - gravity, electromagnetism, strong force and weak (nuclear decay) force.
* A quantum computer ....... a computer that works based on quantum physics principles. Existing computers work based on off/on logic; there's just two states (0 and 1) and data can only occupy one of these states at a time (a bit). Quantum computers would allow a superposition of all possible states (a qubit) which would expand computational power exponentially, allow for even smaller 'chips' and have applications such as a far more secure encryption of data as well as funky things like teleportation of data.

Come up with any of those and a Nobel Prize is awaiting for you  ;D.
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Offline dwaino

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2012, 06:47:29 PM »
That's why I suggested something small :P

To make the reply easier I'll point it all ;D

-String theory does my head in. This could almost go hand in hand with the Grand Unified Theory. As when the four fundamental forces switched themselves on momentarily after the singularity (albeit in an order), scale is subjective and physics would not have discriminated the laws of gravity once a certain size in space was reached and Newtonian physics took over the macro scale. I'm a believer in that once one is found, then the other will come shortly after. If not, simultaneously. 
-I think we're as close to dark matter as we're going to get without physically holding it at the moment. Unlike most theories and hypothesis', it is currently more than just mathematically plausible. Via gravitational lensing and mapping visible matter of the visible universe which appears to follow 'webs.' Dark energy would be a massive find though and still rather elusive.

Somewhat related, came across this today: http://www.dmanlt.com/2699.html it kind puts a spanner in the idea of panspermia and that the idea that the early Solar System and especially Earth was far too volatile to support life forming compounds, but definitely ups the count of systems with planets with life friendly conditions  ;D
http://www.space.com/16135-distant-galaxy.html I found this pretty cool last month too


One of my favorite images of simulating dark and visible matter. It's just mind blowing that the single points of light would be cluster upon cluster of galaxies.


Just thought I'd chuck up the best example of lensing, for sake of the post
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Offline dwaino

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2012, 06:49:34 PM »
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Offline dwaino

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2012, 03:59:42 PM »
Keeping with the science theme, Curiosity has touched down on Mars  :cheers
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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2012, 05:41:35 PM »
Keeping with the science theme, Curiosity has touched down on Mars  :cheers

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Offline dwaino

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Re: Higgs Boson
« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2012, 05:45:48 PM »
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Online one-eyed

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Re: Science thread [merged]
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2012, 05:52:49 PM »
I've altered the thread title in keeping the general science tone  :thumbsup.


:lol

Offline dwaino

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